Library and Archives Canada
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Institutional links

Genealogy and Family History

Where to Search: Places

Yukon


Historical Notes

Map

Source

The Atlas of Canada.
[http://atlas.nrcan.gc.ca/
site/index.html]

The Native People of the Yukon are part of the Athapaskan linguistic family. The first white explorer to reach the Yukon was Sir John Franklin in 1825. Thereafter, permanent contacts were maintained by Hudson's Bay Company fur traders. At the end of the nineteenth century, large numbers of white people immigrated here to prospect for gold, although they did not stay for long. In one month in 1898 though, Dawson became the largest Canadian city west of Winnipeg.

Researchers interested in ancestors who lived in the Yukon use the main types of genealogical sources.

Territorial Websites

GenWeb
[www.rootsweb.com/%7Ewebsites/international/canada.html]

Gold Rush Database
[www.yukongenealogy.com/content/database_search.htm]

Yukon Archival Union List
[www.yukoncouncilofarchives.ca/sections/yaul/yaul.html]

The official provincial government Web site
[www.gov.yk.ca/] contains useful information about the province and its historic records.

The Canadian Encyclopedia Online
[www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=HomePage&Params=A1] allows you to learn more about the history, geography and people of Yukon.

Many libraries hold reference books, local histories, family histories and other books on genealogy. Library and Archives Canada allows you to Browse Lists of Canadian Library Web Sites and Catalogues by province.

The sections on What to Search: Topics and Genealogy Links of this site can provide more useful information about how to do genealogical research research in Yukon. You can also access databases from our Directory of Canadian Genealogical Resources - AVITUS.