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Canadian Globe

Government is about more than administering policies and guiding the state's internal needs. The Canadian government has an important role to play in the international community. Trade, technology, human rights, security, and culture all inform the relationship between states. Skilful diplomacy is required to promote Canadian values at home and around the world.

Use Further Research and Canadian Documents to help you with the activities below.


Activity 9: True North Strong and Free

Compose Your Thoughts

List of regulations for American citizens living in Lower Canada during the War of 1812, July 10, 1812

List of regulations for American citizens living in Lower Canada during the War of 1812, July 10, 1812
Source ]

The regulations in this document were written while British North America was at war with the United States. In times of political instability, what are Canada’s responsibilities to its citizens, and to citizens of other countries?

As a governing political party, you will need to express your goals and your strategy for how Canada will participate on the international stage. Before putting together your platform for international relations, consider the following:

  1. What is Canada's current role in international affairs? (Consider, for example, trade relationships, our role in international conflicts, interaction with the United States, and our role in international aid.) Select a global issue and summarize Canada's current role. Use Further Research and Canadian Documents to search for issues.
  2. Compare your summary of Canada's current international role to your party's priorities for Canada. In 250 words, propose how you would deal with global issues if you were in power. Your challenge is to balance internal and international priorities, set goals for the future, foresee any challenges, and provide a logical plan to implement your global policies.

Think about cultural and political differences of other nations that might affect your policies. Consider how your international policies will be received by Canadian citizens. How will you express your policies to the international community and to Canada?


Activity 10: Money Doesn't Grow On Trees!

Compose Your Thoughts

Program of the CLUB DE L'INDÉPENDANCE DU CANADA, listing political resolutions entitled CANADA FOR CANADIANS, ca. 1880-1889

Program of the "Club de l'indépendance du Canada," listing political resolutions entitled "Canada for Canadians," ca. 1880-1889
Source ]

This document describes a constitution for "The United States of Canada." Does Canada have distinctive characteristics other countries should emulate?

What comes to mind when you think of the "global economy"? Think of the various products that Canada exports (such as electricity, water, and grain) and some of the responsibilities and consequences that come with participation in a global economy (like NAFTA, softwood lumber agreements, and copyright laws). Use Further Research and Canadian Documents for examples of important issues.

In 250 words, your challenge is to examine Canada's economic independence. How independent are we? Should we be more or less interdependent with other countries? Do we have a choice? Based on your findings, what policies for international relations and trade would your political party develop? What challenges or obstacles to your plans do you foresee?

Photograph of a terrestrial globe with letters marking the meridians, used by Sandford Fleming to illustrate the principle of standard time, no date

Terrestrial globe with letters marking the meridians, used by Sandford Fleming to illustrate the principle of standard time, no date [ Source ]

Explore The Canadian State Political Library, a digital collection of historical books related to Canadian politics and government.